'Potential Nobel factory' gets $13M gift

…in honour of the retired 69-year-old lawyer who made much of his fortune in Kentucky Fried Chicken franchises. It will bring together more than 40 scientific researchers and their teams from the faculties of medicine, pharmacy and engineering in a state-of-the-art, $105 million facility that is "a potential Nobel factory," said Dr. David Naylor, dean of the faculty of medicine.

The Toronto Star
June 23, 2004

'Potential Nobel factory' gets $13M gift
U of T's genetic research centre to bear donor's name.Terrence Donnelly hopes it will lead to new treatments.
Elaine Carey

Toronto philanthropist Terrence Donnelly has given $13 million to Canada's first genetic research centre at the University of Toronto, one of the largest donations in its history.

The donation is "a critical step in ensuring U of T continues to be a world leader in biomedical research," president Robert Birgeneau said as he announced the gift at the site of the building, under construction on College St., just west of University Ave.

Donnelly "has the foresight to realize that genetic research is the key to improvements in patient health," he said. Donnelly donated $5 million in May and $8 million this month.

The centre, to open in the fall of 2005, will be renamed the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research in honour of the retired 69-year-old lawyer who made much of his fortune in Kentucky Fried Chicken franchises.

It will bring together more than 40 scientific researchers and their teams from the faculties of medicine, pharmacy and engineering in a state-of-the-art, $105 million facility that is "a potential Nobel factory," said Dr. David Naylor, dean of the faculty of medicine.

"This will be a site to unlock the mysteries of life itself, conducting cellular and biomedical research using the human genome," he said.

Donnelly called the building "a meeting place for great minds" that will "ultimately lead to new understanding of and treatment of many human diseases."

"As humans age, they develop a common yearning for good health free from disease," he said. "The only way toward that is through academic research."

The new centre will be a critical component of the Sciences Discovery District that surrounds it and the Medical and Related Sciences Project (MARS), a research and business complex on the corner of College and University that will promote the discoveries made there, said Dr. John Challis, U of T's vice-president of research.

"The outcomes of very basic research in this building will then be taken across to MARS and developed," he said. "It's a very direct link that will transfer concepts into new treatments and diagnostic tests."

The centre will also provide hands-on training for about 300 U of T students and 100 post-doctoral fellows.


Brought to you by WikidFranchise.org

Risks: Philanthropy, Charity without hustling customers and franchisees, Canada, 20040623 ‘Potential Nobel

kfc
Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License