LCBO profit a façade

…in the past six years, the LCBO has spent more than $300-million of taxpayer money to give its stores the Armani treatment.

National Post
April 27, 2004

LCBO profit a façade

LCBO%20logo%20F.jpg

On one level, Ontario liquor and wine consumers live in a perfect monopoly world. A stroll through a Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO) store these days reveals a Taj Mahal of booze. Richly finished oak wine hutches abound, easy listening music wafts down from ceiling mounted speakers and some stores even feature chi-chi demonstration kitchens. Indeed, a modern day LCBO outlet — which can represent an investment of more than $4-million — looks as though it has been designed by Martha Stewart and stocked by Saint Nick. It's a radical departure from decades ago when the average Ontario liquor store had all the ambiance of a nuclear fallout shelter. All told, in the past six years, the LCBO has spent more than $300-million of taxpayer money to give its stores the Armani treatment.


Brought to you by WikiFranchise.org

Risks: Crown corporation, Exempt from Ontario franchise law obligations, Monopoly or near-monopolies creates sub-optimal capital allocations, Canada, 20040427 LCBO profit

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License