Getting at the hole truth

For several months now, good ol' Timmies has been making its doughnuts at a massive bakery in Brantford and shipping the frozen morsels to warehouses and then to stores where they are revived. Some doughnut lovers have roared at the change, but can you really taste the difference? To see how Tim Hortons holds up against some of its competitors who all bake fresh daily, the Star enlisted four judges for a taste test.

The Toronto Star
November 1, 2003

Getting at the hole truth
The news that Tim Hortons is using frozen dough prompts the question: Will anyone notice?
Nicole MacIntyre

"Doughnuts. Is there anything they can't do?" once mused Homer Simpson.

The famed cartoon dad never met a doughnut he didn't like, but what would he think of the recent Tim Hortons' frozen dough scandal?

D'oh!

For several months now, good ol' Timmies has been making its doughnuts at a massive bakery in Brantford and shipping the frozen morsels to warehouses and then to stores where they are revived.

Some doughnut lovers have roared at the change, but can you really taste the difference?

To see how Tim Hortons holds up against some of its competitors who all bake fresh daily, the Star enlisted four judges for a taste test.

Our methods were highly unscientific: We doled out doughnuts and demanded a mark out of 10 based on appearance, texture and taste. No coffee was allowed.

Our judges ranged widely in their doughnut expertise, but all were familiar with the selected item: the classic honey dipped, which is the closest we could find to Krispy Kreme's signature doughnut.

Famed chef Susur Lee was originally on our tasting team, but after sampling a few doughnuts, decided he was "uneasy" about commenting on fellow members of the food industry.


Risks: Deception, Canada, 20031101 Getting at

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