How I got back at baseball

I wasn't disappointed: My fight with the Blue Jays ended up garnering international media attention. I'm confident I parlayed that $355.37 into six figures' worth of print and broadcast exposure. Bottom line: Revenge can be sweeter than icewine.

National Post
October 11, 2003

How I got back at baseball
David Menzies

Rule One of consumer protest: the media are your best friends.

Case in point: In 1995, when this writer requested that the Toronto Blue Jays provide a refund for two $23 tickets to a game that was never played due to a players' strike, the organization went to great lengths to give me replacement tickets instead of my cash.

Exasperated, I ended up suing the club in small claims court, and prevailed: I was awarded $355.37, covering the price of the tickets, court costs, interest and penalties against the Blue Jays.

But I didn't get what I really wanted — an apology — so I decided to go on the offensive. I used my entire monetary award to purchase 100 custom-made hats and gave them away to anyone who shared my chagrin with the team.

How did I find them? Simple: They contacted me after the media avalanche I orchestrated.

Indeed, part of my game plan after winning in court was to send a one-page press release outlining my battle — along with the cap — to various media outlets.

I wasn't disappointed: My fight with the Blue Jays ended up garnering international media attention. I'm confident I parlayed that $355.37 into six figures' worth of print and broadcast exposure.

Bottom line: Revenge can be sweeter than icewine.

© Copyright 2003 National Post


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