Late swindler was target of jailhouse scam probe

"With this type of personality, they get very, very close and personal to their intended targets or their victims and it's that actual attack on their own self-confidence that really makes it a much more heinous type of crime.''

The Toronto Star
March 7, 2001

Late swindler was target of jailhouse scam probe
Peter Small

Patrick Kinlin, the high-flying Bay Street fraud artist who cheated 78 people out of their savings, died in prison Sunday while under investigation for another scam, this one allegedly operated from prison cells.

“We are conducting an investigation into allegations of criminal fraud involving three inmates from a federal institution,” OPP Detective Staff Sergeant Kevin Corcoran, of the anti-rackets section, said yesterday.

Corcoran would not discuss details of the probe or if Kinlin was involved, but a police source confirmed he was.

Corcoran did say police became aware of the suspected fraud at Frontenac Institution in Kingston on Feb. 7.

That's the month a prison official said Kinlin was moved out of that minimum-security prison and into medium-security Bath Institution, west of Kingston, over unspecified concerns.

Kinlin, 55, died of heart problems Sunday while under palliative care at Kingston Penitentiary Hospital with his sister by his side, said Correctional Services Canada spokesperson Theresa Westfall.

As is standard for prisoners who die in custody, an inquest will be held.

The inmate-run scam was allegedly related to applications for old-age pension cheques that were obtained on the Internet using false identification, the source confirmed.

The cheques would be sent to mail boxes and picked up when prisoners at Frontenac Institution were on day passes. They were believed to be deposited in false bank accounts.

When the police got wind of the scheme in February, Kinlin and the other prisoners were separated, the source confirmed.

The former owner of Kinlin Financial Services, Kinlin was sentenced to five years in prison in January, 2000, after pleading guilty to defrauding 78 people of $12.5 million in savings and investments over a six-year period.

He would have been eligible for full parole in September, when immigration officials planned to deport him to the United States. The Peterborough-born investment adviser had held U.S. citizenship since 1970.

Many of Kinlin's victims lost their entire investment portfolios, said Toronto police Detective Steve Burnham, who led the investigation.

“What should have been their golden years might be something a little more tarnished,” Burnham said.

“With this type of personality, they get very, very close and personal to their intended targets or their victims and it's that actual attack on their own self-confidence that really makes it a much more heinous type of crime.”


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