Burger chain will ask franchisees to embrace company system

“We’ve worked hard on this thing for years. We’re not going to just sell these things off and say goodbye. We’re going to be working with these people and monitoring their progress on a monthly basis…They’re coming into the family, and we’re going to treat them like family.

The Record
April 26, 2000

Burger chain will ask franchisees to embrace company system
Dave Pink

Mike Gorski isn’t out to conquer the fast-food world. All he wants is a significant market share in southwestern Ontario.

Gorski and his sisters, Monika and Jania, own Fast Eddie’s, a chain of eight hamburger outlets – including one in Waterloo – that also feature CrazyFrys and gourmet milkshakes.

The three partners figure the only way to expand is through franchising. Early next month, their first franchise outlet will open in Hamilton.

Gorski says he’s totally in favour of Bill 33, the legislation proposed by the Ontario government. The stipulation that franchisors must fully disclose their financial details to would-be franchisees and treat them fairly makes perfect sense, he says.

The Gorskis, all graduates in business studies at McMaster University in Hamilton, opened their first restaurant in Brantford in 1987. Today, Fast Eddie’s ranks ninth on the Top 10 list of Canadian burger sellers, but Gorski aspires to climb to No. 7 by selling franchises from St. Catharines to Barrie and west to Windsor.

The company joined the Canadian Franchise Association several years ago in preparation for the current expansion drive, Gorski says.

“We will sell another 20 stores in the next 20 months… We will have 20 to 45 stores in the next two years.”

A Fast Eddie’s franchise will cost about $260,000. That fee includes a location, equipment and the Fast Eddie’s system for turning out hamburgers, fries, shakes and chili dogs.

“We’re looking for enthusiastic people, preferably husband and wife teams, with a little management experience,” Gorski says. “We want someone who’s able to market the business, someone’s that’s a bit of an entrepreneur – not someone that just comes in to run a business.”

The company will select and control outlet sites and insist that franchisees embrace “the Fast Eddie’s system.”

“We’ve worked hard on this thing for years. We’re not going to just sell these things off and say goodbye. We’re going to be working with these people and monitoring their progress on a monthly basis…They’re coming into the family, and we’re going to treat them like family.”

The three Gorskis grew up working in a McDonald’s restaurant their father operated in Barrie.

But Gorski says it is the economics of the burger industry – and not their experience in it – that drew them into this line of work.

Fast food, he notes, is a $10.7 billion-a-year industry in Canada.


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